AFL Scoring

The VFL Grand Final in 1945 from the stands of the Melbourne Cricket Ground

The VFL Grand Final in 1945 from the stands of the Melbourne Cricket Ground

On an AFL oval, there are four posts at either end; the two in the middle are the goal posts, and the two on the outer sides are the behind posts. A goal is scored when the ball is driven through the goal posts, at any height, after being kicked by the attacking side. A goal cannot be scored by a defending player and is worth six points.

A behind is scored when the ball is driven between a goal post and a behind post at any height, hits a goal post, or if an attacking player propels the ball past the goal posts by touching it with a part of their body which is not their foot. A behind is also given to the attacking side if the ball touches an opposing player, before it passes between the goals, and is worth one point.

A rushed behind, is scored by the defending team, when a player deliberately scores a behind due to a high chance of the attacking team scoring a goal.

When a goal is scored, the goal umpire raises both hands to elbow height, and just one hand is raised to signal a behind. The goal umpire then confirms the signal with the other goal umpire by waving flags above his head.

After all four quarters have been played, the side with the most points wins. If there is an equal score line, the match is declared a draw unless the situation calls for extra time, such as in a final of certain competitions.