AFL Stats

If you want to bet on AFL fixtures, there’s no better tip than learning how to use AFL stats as a tool to help you improve your betting results. But, many new punters (maybe even some more experienced ones as well) can be intimidated by the sight of AFL stats. These are pages filled with abbreviations and numbers with little explanation on what everything means. So, to help you get started letting these numbers work for you when it comes to AFL betting, here’s a quick guide to AFL stats.

Understanding AFL Stats

The best place to start when it comes to learning about stats is at the very bottom. What do all of the abbreviations mean? Here are all of the stats that will appear on match stat pages with a short description of what they mean. The most popular stats are in blue.

Disposals: These are all offensive stats. Higher numbers in any of these areas show a team that’s good at moving the ball down the field. They will help you determine if a team is strong on the attack.

  • K = Kicks: This is a method of disposing the ball by kicking it to another player on the field or kicking a goal.
  • H = Handballs: This is a method of disposing the ball by holding it in one hand while bumping it to another player on the field with the other hand.
  • D = Disposals: This is getting the ball to any other player on the field via any approved disposal method. Throwing is not allowed in the AFL.
  • CP = Contested Possessions: This is possession of the ball won in a dispute.
  • UP = Uncontested Possessions: This is possession of the ball gained from a teammate.
  • DE% = Effective Disposal Percentage: This is the percentage of successful disposals over the course of a match.

Marks: These are offensive stats. Higher numbers in these areas demonstrate a team that effectively ‘catches’ the ball. These numbers will help you determine if a team is strong on the attack.

  • M = Marks: This is a term that basically means to ‘catch’ the ball.
  • CM = Contested Marks: These are the number of ‘catches’ made in a dispute.
  • m50 = Marks inside 50: These are ‘catches’ made inside the 50 metre line.

Stoppages: These stats are used to determine if a team has a strong ruckman. Higher numbers in these areas can indicated a team that’s good at gaining possession of the ball and creating scoring opportunities.

  • HO = Hit-outs: This is when a team’s ruckman makes contact with the ball first.
  • CL = Centre Clearances: This is when the ruckman clears the ball from a ruck contest.
  • i50 = Inside 50s: These are goal kicking opportunities.

Frees: These are free kicks.

  • FF = Frees For: These are kicks in the team’s favour. A higher number here indicates a strong offensive team.
  • FA = Frees Against: These are kicks that work against a team. A higher number here indicates a team that could be prone to making costly mistakes.

General Play: These are defensive stats. Higher numbers here indicate a team that has a strong backline that will put any opposing offense to the test.

  • T = Tackles: A higher number here indicates a team that has a strong defensive line.
  • 1% = One Percenters: A high number here indicates a defence that’s good at such defensive elements as knock-ons, spoils, smothers, and sheperds.
  • BO = Bounce Outs: A high number here indicates a good defence.

Scoring: These are offensive statistics. A high number in these areas indicates a team that’s good at scoring goals.

  • G = Goals: This is the number of goals scored during the game.
  • B = Behinds: These are points. 3 behinds = 3 points.
  • G% = Goal Accuracy Percentage: This is the percentage of kicks that are accurately kicked during a game.
  • GA = Goal Assists: A high number in goal assists indicates a strong offensive team that’s good at creating scoring opportunities.

Putting AFL Stats to Work

The next step in using AFL stats is analysing them to predict how certain AFL teams will perform in future matches. By looking at these numbers you can identify trends that can aid in your decision on where to put your money. For example, identify a team’s strengths and weaknesses based on their stats. Do they have a high G%? Are they lacking in any of the general play statistics?

Once you’ve figured out where your team will succeed and possibly fail, you can see how they measure up to the opposition. If your team is particularly strong on the attack, they will definitely do well against a team with a lacking defence. If your team’s strong point is their backline, be sure to back them on all fixtures against opponents with lower attacking stats. You can also use their win/loss records as a helpful guide to predicting future wins and/or losses. If your team has historically won against a certain opponent, chances are they’ll be successful again.

For more information on how you can bet on AFL fixtures, check out our AFL tipping guide. Then get over to Ladbrokes.com.au to view all of the latest AFL bets on offer. Ladbrokes.com.au features the best possible odds out there, and, with around the clock access to AFL betting from home, there isn’t a more convenient way to put your knowledge of AFL stats to work in improving your betting results.